Conversation

Bones: You’re just like a thief.
Kirk: Am not. Thieves don’t always obey rules, are people you wouldn’t usually suspect, have groups of people like gangs, and actually if it’s okay with you I’ll just stop talking right now.

The Last Romulan Dreadnaught

The Last Romulan Dreadnaught

Profile: The final ship of the current production line of dreadnaughts. The line was being retired after the development of the new Ghost Ship (Birds of Prey). Improvements were made over time which each vessel launch and is substantially different than previous versions.

Pictured: The Last Dreadnaught being attacked by a Ghost Ship in the 2260s and proven to be no match to the newest ship. Incidentally killed an opponent of the current Praetor.

Appeared in Star Trek Alien Spotlight: Romulans (II), IDW Comics

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reasonably-annoyed-fog:

my favourite recurring joke is that people in star trek are secretly big time into trash. Picard basically plays an unhealthy amount of LA Noire. B’Elanna reading klingon romance was not a unique incident, we have Quark catching Odo reading some raunchy stuff, and Jadzia buys Bashir straight-up porn at Nog’s yard sale, because of course she does.

we also get some neat insights into the holo industry in the episode where the Doctor’s holo novel gets published without his consent and becomes a big hit in the alpha quadrant

what I personally would like to see explored: how do people in deep space keep up with pop culture? I assume people either stock up on entertainment when they visit a starbase or the internet of the future is really fucking good. Do trends reach Deep Space 9 a little later than the rest of the federation? Does Quark sometimes order a new holosuite programme two years after it came out? And how do cultural influences work? Is somewhere out there a romulan ensign who got his hands on some old YA novels and smuggles it back home, creating a cult following the federation doesn’t even know about until the political landscape changes?

captaincrusher:

The rest of Star Trek is equally focused on classical music as well. The Klingons are known for opera, so that’s also quite classical.

There’s an episode of Voyager where we get to hear some more modern Klingon music. It sounds more like noise, because it’s supposed to be annoying stuff from teenagers, but it’s still interesting to get a glimpse of something new.

The Bajorans have some… flutes.

peridotsarelongterm:

I’ve often wondered this about the music in particular. I haven’t watched much of the 90s series, but from TOS and TNG it feels like what they have is:

  • Classical stuff, like Mozart
  • Folk/hippie music played on bicycle wheels
  • Whatever that late 60s/Fifth Dimension-sounding stuff is that Uhura sings (and that Prime subtitles surround with the number 6 for some reason)

Where is the classic rock? The soul? Stuff from outside the US, too? Did that get lost in the 1990s dark ages and it was never recoverable?

I would love to live in Trek universe, but I’d miss the fuck out of varied music.

captaincrusher:

One thing I miss in Star Trek is contemporary popular culture.

I mean, yeah I get that everyone has read Shakespeare. Everyone likes movies from the 1950’s. But where are the 23rd century romantic comedies? The 22nd century holo-adventures?

The benefit of having such a vast universe as Star Trek is that there’s nothing stopping them from having one character be really into listening to Bolian jagalaggaflaxen pop. Some other characters could have a heated debate on who’s going to win the finale of that reality show on Balancar where one of the contestants are partly eaten every week.

Where are the celebrities? Not everyone in Starfleet will have a picture of Zefram Cochrane on the wall in their quarters. There has to be people that attend concerts, read new books and read trashy magazines to find out if Bkex and Marla Quartz are having a baby.

References I like to this effect: B’Elanna reading Klingon romance. Julian and Garak discussing modern theatre.

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regina-cordium:

i physically couldn’t stop myself

ambassadorquark:

this image.

Photo

Photo

owenburnett:

owenburnett:

Star Trek: TOS 1.28, The City on the Edge of Forever

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peridotsarelongterm:

Yeah, I couldn’t take that. Classical is great, but it’s not dance music. How am I supposed to bump and grind drunk Worf with just Data playing a Bajoran flute? I guess at least the Klingon youth stuff sounds like metal. That’s something.

captaincrusher:

The rest of Star Trek is equally focused on classical music as well. The Klingons are known for opera, so that’s also quite classical.

There’s an episode of Voyager where we get to hear some more modern Klingon music. It sounds more like noise, because it’s supposed to be annoying stuff from teenagers, but it’s still interesting to get a glimpse of something new.

The Bajorans have some… flutes.

peridotsarelongterm:

I’ve often wondered this about the music in particular. I haven’t watched much of the 90s series, but from TOS and TNG it feels like what they have is:

  • Classical stuff, like Mozart
  • Folk/hippie music played on bicycle wheels
  • Whatever that late 60s/Fifth Dimension-sounding stuff is that Uhura sings (and that Prime subtitles surround with the number 6 for some reason)

Where is the classic rock? The soul? Stuff from outside the US, too? Did that get lost in the 1990s dark ages and it was never recoverable?

I would love to live in Trek universe, but I’d miss the fuck out of varied music.

captaincrusher:

One thing I miss in Star Trek is contemporary popular culture.

I mean, yeah I get that everyone has read Shakespeare. Everyone likes movies from the 1950’s. But where are the 23rd century romantic comedies? The 22nd century holo-adventures?

The benefit of having such a vast universe as Star Trek is that there’s nothing stopping them from having one character be really into listening to Bolian jagalaggaflaxen pop. Some other characters could have a heated debate on who’s going to win the finale of that reality show on Balancar where one of the contestants are partly eaten every week.

Where are the celebrities? Not everyone in Starfleet will have a picture of Zefram Cochrane on the wall in their quarters. There has to be people that attend concerts, read new books and read trashy magazines to find out if Bkex and Marla Quartz are having a baby.

References I like to this effect: B’Elanna reading Klingon romance. Julian and Garak discussing modern theatre.

I was told off by @supjello​ in the tags for ignoring Riker and Harry jazzing it up on trombone and clarinet. So there’s something there, although I would argue that music that’s 400 years old at that point is still somewhat classical.

I posted a clip with the Klingon music here

I kinda like it? It sounds like it could be music but it’s also very strange and alien. That short clip is as close as we get to fresh, new music in Star Trek.

Speaking of the lack of new music in Star Trek…

Speaking of the lack of new music in Star Trek, here’s that scene in Voyager where Doc gets to listen to youthful, Klingon tunes. 

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captaincrusher:

Uhh, I’m watching that Enterprise episode where T’Pol goes through a “premature” pon farr and I hate it.

Spock was angry, moody and slightly violent. T’Pol runs around in her underwear trying to force herself on her crew mates.

That whole thing is a male fantasy. Like, of course she can’t just become reclusive and pissed, she has to become so horny she can’t control herself.

The way they wrote T’Pol is really often unbearably sexist.

The main thing I feel with how they wrote T’Pol is that she is almost always powerless.

Powerless to her urges, to her disease, to the whims of High Command, to mental manipulation, to emotion. Archer can always overpower her, despite her supposed superior strength.

I have written about this before. The writers constantly break her down and sexualize her at the same time, which gives this impression that they fetischize her powerlessness and lack of control.

(I’ve tried to find another word instead of fetischize but that’s the most accurate one I can find.)

Again, that’s a male fantasy. They took a character that had the outline to be strong and independent and broke her into little pieces. Because non-emotional, strong and independent female characters aren’t attractive.

I like parts of Enterprise but it’s almost painful to watch these T’Pol episodes. Jolene Blalock plays vulnerable so well. She’s great at showing how T’Pol breaks. But I hate to watch it.

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captaincrusher:

Me: I love Star Trek.

Also me: Let me tell you everything that’s wrong with Star Trek

A non-Trekkie: Starts talking about everything that’s wrong with Star Trek.

Me: